Friday, November 26, 2010

The Total Experience of Photography

When I head out to make photographs, I always strive to bring home quality images.
In order to do so, there is so much more involved than gathering the photo equipment, heading to a location and pressing the shutter.
Making a quality image takes time...Photography involves all of the senses and is an ongoing creative process.

 Last weekend when returning home from walking my dogs I spotted some beautiful autumn leaves dropped from our Bradford pear tree. I was taken with the way they had transformed from their summer green color to the rich hues of autumn: not all at once, but obviously in stages, creating intricate patterns of color on each individual leaf. Although I had so many other tasks to attend to in preparation for the Thanksgiving holiday, I decided to MAKE the time to photograph the leaves.

I gathered my equipment and headed out into the yard.
THREE hours later (YES, THREE HOURS LATER!!!) I returned inside with a handful of images and a feeling of calm.  It is the "process" of photography that feeds my soul.
I believe a photograph is made up of all one's senses.  Taking the solitary time to be in the field to make images slows me down, allowing me to fully experience my surroundings, my emotions, my thoughts and each of my senses. When all of these elements blend together, my creative process kicks in and the photographic experience is enhanced. 
I have included a few images from my efforts last weekend. Will they ever be printed and shown? Maybe, maybe not. But that isn't the point. While, to some, they may appear as just images of leaves, it was the total experience I felt while making them that drives me to share them with you at this time.

2 comments:

  1. Lovely images, Wendy - and great thoughtful comments about the process of photography. It does make us slow down and see more deeply, and in the process great images are made, like these, that show the beauty of nature and the world. Photography is a multi-sensory sport!!

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  2. Definitely multi-sensory...we do our best work when we are immersed in it without any distractions.

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